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F.1.a. Organizing, Lobbying and Protesting

Breines, Winifred, The Trouble Between Us: An Uneasy History of White and Black Women in the Feminist Movement, New York, Oxford University Press, 2007, pp. 280

Coote, Anna ; Campbell, Beatrix, Sweet Freedom: The Struggle for Women’s Liberation in Britain, London, Pan Books, 1982, pp. 258

Study of British movement since 1960s, legislative changes and political developments affecting women in work, the family, sex and culture. Chapter 1, pp. 9-47, charts the evolution of the movement in terms of key protests, campaigns and organization, including some examples of nonviolent action.

Douglas, Martin, Representations of Anzac: A feminist perspective, Teaching History, Vol. 52, issue 4, 2018, pp. 27-29

The Anzac legend has been traditionally dominated by white males and was increasingly brought under the spotlight with the emergence of feminist movements from the 1960s onwards. But it is was feminists that rekindled interest in Anzac in the 1980s with the Women Against Rape in War protests at Anzac Day events in the early 1980s. The Second Wave Feminist movement in the 1960s and 70s saw a significant shift towards a more specific focus on issues around violence against women, most particularly in the realm of domestic/family violence. The Australian feminist movement also opposed the Australian involvement in the Vietnam War and promoted the cause of nuclear disarmament.

Duchen, Clare, Feminism in France from May 1968 to Mitterand, London, Routledge, 1986, pp. 165

Chapter 1, ‘Beginnings’ examines role of women in May 1968 and the emergence of the Mouvement de Liberation des Femmes in 1970, laying of a wreath on the tomb of the unknown soldier to commemorate his wife (leading to arrests), support for women strikers (e.g. in a hat factory in Troyes) and the 5th April 1971 Manifesto by 343 prominent women who had resorted to illegal abortions. Later chapters explore ideological divisions within the movement, theoretical issues and the relationship of feminists to socialist government in France.

 

Evans, Sara, Personal Politics: The Roots of Women’s Liberation in the Civil Rights Movement and the New Left, New York, Vintage, 1980, pp. 288

Using her personal experience the author examines how women were dismayed by their treatment in radical movements, and how they turned their activist skills to feminist campaigning.

Freeman, Jo, The Politics of Women’s Liberation, New York, Longman, 1975, pp. 268

Examines the evolution of second wave feminism in the USA from the early protests.

Gelb, Joyce, Feminism and Political Action, In Dalton, Russel J.; Kuechler, Manfred , Challenging the Political Order: New Social and Political Movements in Western Democracies Oxford, Oxford University Press, , 1990, pp. 137-156

Comparing the US, British and Swedish movements.

Malagreca, Miguel, Lottiamo Ancora: Reviewing One Hundred and Fifty Years of Italian Feminism, Journal of International Women's Studies, Vol. 7, issue 4 (May), 2006, pp. 69-89

Includes material on the second wave of Italian feminism in 1960s and 1970s and developments on divorce, family law and employment law in the 1970s and 1980s, Ends with some discussion of lesbian and queer struggles for recognition.

Ryan, Barbara, Feminism and the Women’s Movement: Dynamics of Change in Social Movement Ideology and Activism, New York, Routledge, 1992, pp. 272

After looking at earlier history of US feminism, examines 2nd wave and in particular the mobilization around the Equal Rights Act passed in 1975; also explores ideological divisions within the movement.

Steinem, Gloria, My Life On The Road, London, One World Publications , 2016, pp. 310

Autobyography of Gloria Steinem, journalist and prominent activist in feminist campaigns in the USA from the 1960s onward, who was also one of the foundersof Ms Magazine. It provides detailed insights into the early feminist ways of orgsanizing and protesting, and the internal politics of the movement. the book also covers Steinem's earlier two years in India and contact with the Gandhian movement, her links with Native American women, and her continued actvism in varied causes. 

Threlfall, Monica, The Women’s Movement in Spain, New Left Review, issue 151 (May/June), 1985, pp. 44-73

Discusses post-Franco development of feminist movement and legislative results.

Wilson, Elizabeth, What Is to be Done about Violence Against Women?, Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1983, pp. 256

Chapter 6, ‘Feminists fight back’ (pp.169-224) covers the protests in Britain against male violence, and also constructive organizational responses and the campaign for legal change and challenges to prevailing attitudes.